Titus Day trial: Guy Sebastian’s Madness tour revenue totaled $2.9 million

Guy Sebastian’s private messages to a superfan, his wife’s pay rate and the ex-eating row with another ex-reality star have come to light.

Guy Sebastian’s celebrity stylist wife has given evidence for the first time after a jury heard the singer raised $2.9million for a six-show tour and contacted a superfan to help with the legal fight against his former manager.

The revelation is the latest to emerge during the trial of former manager Titus Day, who allegedly fraudulently embezzled around $900,000 allegedly owed to the singer.

Mr. Day denies any wrongdoing and claims that Mr. Sebastian owes him money.

As the trial resumed Thursday, Damien Luscombe returned to the witness box to testify.

He was the boss of an accounting firm called White Sky, which Mr Sebastian recruited to help manage his finances in 2015.

When cross-examined by Mr Day’s lawyer, Dominic Toomey SC, Mr Luscombe agreed that his company had received a document showing a financial breakdown of the Madness Tour.

The court was told that the document prepared by tour manager Dan Redgrave showed the tour revenue was $2.9 million.

After tour costs – including $712,000 for venue costs and $1.5 million for road costs – were deducted, the court was told the document showed Mr. Sebastian enjoyed nearly 236 $000.

Mr. Day’s company, 6 Degrees, was entitled to a 20% commission on profits, which the court said amounted to about $47,000.

“I would say looking at this (document) it doesn’t include merchandise,” Mr Luscombe said when asked if the figures included revenue from the sale of merchandise.

When Mr. Toomey said “there would be more commissionable revenue on the merchandise, assuming the merchandise is producing a profit”, Mr. Luscombe agreed and said “that’s right”.

One of Mr Sebastian’s superfans, Christian Bugno, who appeared via video link from Las Vegas, was later called to give evidence.

Mr Bugno told the court that after Mr Sebastian performed on his 21st birthday over a decade ago, he paid the former Australian Idol winner to perform at his wedding in Venice in 2016.

“My communication with Mr. Sebastian was many years ago when I first moved to Vegas,” Mr. Bugno told the court.

“I said if I could support at any time, I would be happy to support by providing evidence.”

Asked in more detail about his relationship with Mr. Sebastian, Mr. Bugno admitted to providing “false” information to the court and revealed that Mr. Sebastian had sent text messages begging him to help with the trial as recently as the May 24.

“Brother sorry but it’s so urgent because I’m in court is there any way to find out who paid for Titus [sic] flight to Venice,” Mr. Sebastian sent about an hour after he finished testifying in court.

After Mr Bugno was forced to show the text messages in court, he said he replied and said his father had paid for the business class flights for Mr Sebastian and Mr Day to attend the wedding.

Mr Sebastian replied “thank you bro, that’s amazing timing…I’ll call you once it’s done and I’m done testifying…sorry to bother you with that”.

The court was told the couple had further discussions over an email exchange between Mr Bugno and Vogue Entertainment Agency, whom he originally asked to help arrange Mr Sebastian’s representation at the marriage.

After Mr Sebastian asked if Vogue had been used to book the wedding concert, Mr Bugno texted back saying ‘no, we did it direct with Titus and 6 Degrees’.

Mr Sebastian said: ‘I’ll expand on this once this is all over…thanks for continuing this’.

“I’m so embarrassed to have to include you in this.”

Mr. Bugno replied saying “Brother don’t be embarrassed, here to help and provide the necessary evidence and information”.

The court later heard that the dispute with Mr. Sebastian was not the only one involving Mr. Day and one of his former clients.

Lachlan Evans, the Hall Chadwick firm’s insolvency manager who was involved in overseeing the liquidation of Mr Day’s 6 Degrees company, said the former reality TV contestant X Factor, Matt Gresham, was also in conflict with Mr. Day.

Mr Evans said Mr Day claimed Mr Gresham owed him $16,000.

‘There are no invoices but money was lent to Matt by the company…he refused to pay it back,’ Mr Day wrote in an email to Mr Evans.

“Unfortunately he’s a liar and doesn’t want to pay it back, but the money is due.”

The court was told Mr Gresham had said Mr Day’s claim was ‘not true’.

The trial will continue on Friday with Mr Sebastian’s wife Jules set to give further evidence.

She briefly took the witness stand on Thursday to explain that she had been offered $15,000 to be an ambassador for an early childhood education app called PlayKids.

Ms Sebastian told the court that $6,403 had been deducted from her bank account by Mr Day.