CommonWealth Magazine

GOV. CHARLIE BAKER and current and future mayors of Somerville took a joy ride on part of the new Green Line extension on Thursday – a preview of the attractions to come as the $ 2.3 billion project draws to a close.

The Union Square branch of the Green Line extension is expected to open in March and the branch to Medford is expected to start in May. The two opening dates represent slight delays. But the big news is that the Green Line extension, originally priced at over $ 3 billion, is now set to exceed its budget by $ 2.3 billion with enough money to pay off Somerville and Cambridge. for the $ 75 million. they have invested in the project and still have money in reserve.

Baker would not speculate on how much money will be left, saying there is still a lot of electrical work to be done, but he said the credit goes to how the T handled oversight of the complicated project.

Instead of handing the responsibility over to a small team at T who also had other responsibilities to juggle, Baker said the decision was made to hire project manager John Dalton and a dedicated team of around 43 people who focused on extending the green line and nothing else.

“This is what they worked on. That’s it, ”said Baker, who said the same approach was used for the construction of a commuter train line from Boston to New Bedford and Fall River. Baker said the South Coast Rail project was also on schedule.

Somerville’s mayor-elect Katjana Ballantyne, who joined current mayor Joseph Curtatone at the press conference at the new Lechmere stop in Cambridge, also provided insight into what is likely to become a common refrain at the opening of the extension of the Green Line: long?

Ballantyne pulled out a copy of the Somerville Journal from 2005. On the front page was a photo of his 7-year-old daughter, who spoke out in favor of the project at a meeting attended by former mayor Michael Capuano and the former general of MBTA. Manager Dan Grabauskas.

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Editor, Commonwealth

On Bruce mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of Commonwealth magazine. Bruce came to Commonwealth from Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions spanning business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and was the Worldhead of the State House bureau in the late 1980s. He also reported for the WorldSpotlight Team’s, won a Loeb Award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state pension system. It served as Worldpolitical editor in 1994 and continued to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. AT CommonwealthBruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written on a wide range of issues with a particular focus on politics, fiscal policy, energy and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

On Bruce mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of Commonwealth magazine. Bruce came to Commonwealth from Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions spanning business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and was the Worldhead of the State House bureau in the late 1980s. He also reported for the WorldSpotlight Team’s, won a Loeb Award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state pension system. It served as Worldpolitical editor in 1994 and continued to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. AT CommonwealthBruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written on a wide range of issues with a particular focus on politics, fiscal policy, energy and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

Ballantyne said her daughter came to see her after speaking and asked her, “Mom, when can I take the train? I said maybe when you are in senior year in high school.

Ballantyne added, “She’s 25 now.”

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