Come see our real-world shots of Hasselblad’s new 100MP medium format camera

by Jeremy Gray

posted Wednesday, November 9, 2022 3:55 PM EST

Hasselblad’s new 100-megapixel medium format camera, the X2D 100C, is an extremely sleek camera with fantastic image quality, to boot. I recently had the chance to familiarize myself with the new camera, my first experience with a Hasselblad camera. While my full hands-on review is still ongoing, my real-world test images can be viewed and downloaded now in our Hasselblad X2D 100C gallery.

Although my full review goes into more depth on the design and usability of the X2D 100C, I would be remiss if I did not mention or at least touch on the subject. After all, a big part of Hasselblad’s appeal is its excellent design and build quality. The X2D 100C is no exception. The camera may have the same image sensor as the Fujifilm GFX 100S, but the approaches of the two cameras are very different. While the GFX 100S opts for a more traditional dial design with lots of buttons, the X2D 100C relies heavily on its large, crisp touchscreen. The are buttons and dials, but not many. As far as camera “feel” goes, the X2D 100C feels like an extremely high-end device. That’s not to say the GFX 100S feels bad because it doesn’t, but the X2D 100C feels particularly great.

Hasselblad X2D 100C with Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V lens at F11, 7.1 sec, ISO 64. This image has been edited to taste in Hasselblad Phocus.

While high ISO performance is good, you get the most out of the sensor when shooting at lower ISOs. At base ISO (64), the X2D 100C delivers images with impeccable detail, far beyond what you can get with even the best full-frame cameras. Dynamic range is also fantastic, both in-camera and when editing raw images in your editor of choice. I used Hasselblad’s free in-house software, Phocus. You can recover a significant amount of detail in highlights and shadows, even when an image looks blown out.

Hasselblad X2D 100C with Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V lens at F13, 20 sec, ISO 64. This image has been edited to taste in Hasselblad Phocus.

When it comes to autofocus, the X2D 100C’s sensor includes phase-detection AF points, which means the camera has a hybrid autofocus system. The original X1D 50C and its Mark II successor relied solely on contrast-detection AF. I can’t speak to specific improvements, having never used these cameras, but when Fujifilm moved the GFX system into hybrid AF territory, the gains were significant. I imagine similar improvements are in play here with the X2D 100C.

Hasselblad X2D 100C with Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V lens at F16, 1/11 sec, ISO 1600. This image has been edited to taste in Hasselblad Phocus.

There’s a lot more to discuss about the X2D 100C, including its overall performance, super sharp and large EVF, user interface, and built-in SSD. These topics and more will be covered in my full review. In the meantime, head to the Hasselblad X2D 100C gallery.