Analog photography: medium format cameras and cinematographic equipment for beginners

While digital photography has almost completely replaced earlier photochemical processes, older film cameras still exert an irresistible charm. It is mainly young people who find analog photography an entertaining challenge.

(Picture:

Michael jordan

)

Analog and digital photography still coexist and share many intersections. Here you will find our articles on “Analog photography meets digital photography”.

Unlike the digital camera, where the same sensor is always exposed, in analog photography you need a separate light-sensitive film for each frame. The change is facilitated by a rolled up flexible film strip. After each exposure, a new section of the roll is transported past the camera image window, so that one photo is taken next to the other.

This technique was introduced by the Eastman Kodak Company in the late 1880s. In 1901 the 61.5 millimeter wide film, later called medium format film, was released. Gradually, smaller formats followed, such as the tiny Minox film for 8 × 11 millimeter images, Pocket, Kodak Instamatic and the popular 35 millimeter wide film.

  • Access to all heise + content
  • proprietary testing, advice and history: independent, well-founded
  • Read c’t, iX, MIT Technology Review, Mac & i, Make, c’t photography right in your browser
  • register once – read on all devices – can be canceled monthly
  • first month free, then monthly from € 9.95
  • Weekly newsletter with personalized reading recommendations from the editor-in-chief

Start the month FREE

Start your FREE month now

Already subscribed to heise +?

Sign up and read

Register now and read the articles right away

More information about heise +

Source of the article

Disclaimer: This article is generated from the feed and is not edited by our team.

Source link