5 things to know today: Suppression of races, Project Tundra, License sale, Transmission Deer, Horace High

1. Police crack down on street racing in the streets of Fargo

Many of the more than two dozen bills submitted by North Dakota lawmakers for consideration in their next special session attempt to restrict vaccination requirements and the teaching of critical race theory in schools public – causes of division are expected to add to the heavy workload of the Legislative Assembly when it reconvenes. next week.

The state legislature will meet in Bismarck from November 8 for a very busy special session with particular emphasis on the redistribution of legislative constituencies and allocate federal coronavirus relief funds.

Corn 26 mostly unrelated bills tabled by lawmakers can still become law if they go through a Republican-controlled vetting process at the start of the session and subsequent votes. GOP leaders said they expected one or two proposals on vaccine mandates and critical race theory to move forward.

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2. Project Tundra Responds to Carbon Dioxide Leak Concerns During Historic Permit Hearing

As part of the Project Tundra venture, Minnkota Power Cooperative is looking to upgrade Milton Young Station, a coal-fired power plant in North Dakota, to capture and store its own carbon emissions.  Special for Forum News Service

As part of the Project Tundra venture, Minnkota Power Cooperative is looking to upgrade Milton Young Station, a coal-fired power plant in North Dakota, to capture and store its own carbon emissions. Special for Forum News Service

Scientists and leaders of Project Tundra appeared before North Dakota regulators on Tuesday, November 2 to discuss the authorization of the high-profile carbon capture proposal in a hearing that focused in part on the security of the company’s underground storage process.

Grand Forks-based Minnkota Power Cooperative’s Tundra Project, the billion-dollar plan to upgrade Milton R. Young’s coal-fired power plant in Oliver County for carbon capture, would be the largest facility of this type to the world if it succeeds, and heads of state hope it could also provide a plan for the decarbonization of other coal-fired power plants in North Dakota and beyond.

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3. Sale of Fargo Nightclub Liquor License Gets Conditional Approval

The Africa International restaurant and nightclub is located along 45th Street southwest of Fargo.  The official address is 4554 Seventh Ave.  S. David Samson / The Forum

The Africa International restaurant and nightclub is located along 45th Street southwest of Fargo. The official address is 4554 Seventh Ave. S. David Samson / The Forum

Months after the Africa Restaurant & Nightclub’s liquor license was suspended, the Fargo City Commission conditionally approved the transfer of the establishment’s liquor license to a local real estate company.

The owner of the building, 518 Properties, owned by Tyler Brandt, aims to take over operations with an agreement to purchase the license from the club’s former owners.

Commissioners had previously revoked the license due to public safety concerns, including the shooting death of a club bouncer in a nearby parking lot in May.

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4. Iowa study finds humans donated COVID-19 to deer

File photo / Forum News Service

File photo / Forum News Service

A new study of the Iowa white-tailed deer population reveals that humans gave animals a dozen variations of the coronavirus in 2020 and 2021, causing asymptomatic infections that the animals then quickly spread among themselves.

While previous research had reported that 40% of deer studied had been exposed to the coronavirus, the new findings are the first to document human-to-animal infection in nature.

Transmission from deer to humans has not been established.

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5. A Sneak Peek of West Fargo’s New School: Horace High School

Students have lunch in the commons of Horace High School on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 in Horace, North Dakota.  Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Students have lunch in the commons of Horace High School on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 in Horace, North Dakota. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

The West Fargo School District officially has three high schools.

After delays due to a number of variables including supply chain issues in the construction industry, Horace High School welcomed its freshman class to the building on Wednesday, October 27.

The students, who have remained at Heritage College since the start of the 2021-22 school year, took virtual lessons on Monday and Tuesday to give teachers and administrators time to settle in the building and set up the classrooms.

Officials said the delay was due to a number of issues mostly beyond the control of contractors, said Mark Lemer, construction coordinator for the district.

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